Shrimping Shutdown Encourages Sustainable Aquaculture

A moratorium on the 2014 New England shrimp season provides yet another reason to turn to sustainable aquaculture practices. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission announced the shutdown this winter, stating that shrimp stocks in northeast waters are at their lowest since 1984. This is just one example of shrimping shutdowns happening throughout the U.S. Louisiana and parts of the Gulf are experiencing limited shrimping seasons as well.temp-post-image

While the moratorium will hopefully allow some time to rebuild natural shrimp stock, the temporary shutdown doesn’t address long-term problems associated with the shrimping industry. Overfishing plays a detrimental role in eliminating natural shrimp populations. Rising ocean temperatures associated with global warming also affect shrimp. Warmer water hinder shrimps’ reproductive cycle, which is dependent upon cooler water temperatures. Many fishing and shrimping practices are still detrimental to the environment as well. Unfortunately no concrete research has yet determined a sustainable method for shrimp fishing.

The moratorium serves as the first time in 20 years that the shrimp fishery has been shut down. Hopefully it will also serve as a wake-up call for the need of a long-term, sustainable solution.

One possible solution is already gaining notoriety around the world. Aquaculture has the potential to meet our growing food demands while eliminating the harmful environmental impacts associated with fishing, shrimping, and agriculture.

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Closed-loop, land-based aquaculture, like Happy Healthy Shrimp, raise delectable seafood in self-contained systems. Closely monitored water quality eliminates the needs for pharmaceutical or fertilizer additives and ensures consumers are provided with healthy, naturally grown food. Aquaculture produces an organic food source that doesn’t negatively impact our environment and marine ecosystem populations.

Aquaculture practices are already gaining notoriety around the world as a long-term solution to our global food needs. Developing sustainable practices like aquaculture will become more important than ever as we continue depleting natural food stocks.

Source:

“Canceling of Gulf of Maine Shrimp Season a Heavy Blow.” Portland Press Herald. Maine Today Media, Inc. December 2013. Web. February 2014.